Lyn Ulbricht Speaks about Other People Involved In Silk Road

Silkroad creator’s mother, Lyn Ulbricht expresses her thoughts on another corruption uncovered in the Silkroad saga for the world to know.

She talks about the controversial fact that there are others who were picked up on their involvement in Silkroad drug charges, though none ended up close to Ross’ sentence which makes the grotesque disparity quite evident.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

Lyn Ulbricht Two crooked cops by the name Carl Force, former DEA agent, and former Secret Service agent Shawn Bridges have been accused of stealing Silkroad bitcoins.

Most recently, Bridges is suspected of stealing Silkroad bitcoins once again, and in two more cases.

He was helping himself to $700,000 USD more and another $20,000 in BTC to top the first $800,000 he had already been caught red-handed on during the Silkroad investigation.

What was Silkroad prosecuting attorney Preet Bharara’s response? Despite the explicitly tampered evidence in the hands of corrupt fed agents, Ross Ulbricht remains guilty.

The Barbaric Sentence

Lyn tells how U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest issued a barbaric sentence just because Ross was deemed a political threat by the judge herself.

Isn’t this a bit harsh on a man whose only weapon was a keyboard or computer, considering the grave crimes of murderers and child molesters?

Dread Pirate Roberts and the Silkroad darknet market he created was a triumph of libertarian ideals and technology that the government cannot control.

It’s the blatant truth behind the Silkroad that once existed in the dark web.

However, the judge found Ross Ulbricht’s writings and beliefs to be deeply troubling and highly dangerous.

Lyn and the defense strongly believe that her son was treated and jailed unfairly mainly because he was the creator of the first online black market that ultimately became the largest illicit drug platform.

Three of the notable arrests include leading Silk Road vendor Jan Slomp, biggest cocaine and heroin vendor Steven Sadler, and Silkroad administrator Peter Nash.

They received a 10-year, 5-year, and 17-month sentence respectively.

Moreover, the corrupt agents got 6 and 7 years while Silkroad 2.0’s key player Brian Farrell was given an 8-year prison term.

Now, what about Ulbricht? Charged with money laundering, conspiracy to narcotic trafficking, computer hacking, and murder which was eventually dropped though he was still handed down a life sentence, and without the possibility of parole.

Ulbricht’s supporters have just gotten their speculations confirmed that Ross served as a scapegoat for the failed drug policy of the American government.

His mother states that this convinced her that her son was a political prisoner.

The government wanted to make an example out of him to warn others and deter them from creating criminal sites similar to the Silkroad.

However, the results are otherwise with even more dark web sites that have emerged today which are far bigger than the original Silkroad marketplace.

Corruption in the Silkroad Case

lyn ulbrichtFirst off, Lyn points out that the Silkroad trial was mishandled right from the start.

She questions the Senator of New York’s closure of Silkroad followed by strangely ordering the trial in the state, rather than in California where he was arrested.

Charles Schumer had connections with the legal prosecutor as his own special counsel and the Silkroad judge having been suggested by the senator himself.

Lyn alleges that research done by a professional forensic pathologist concluded that no scientific evidence proves Silkroad drugs caused the alleged deaths.

Lyn expresses how terrible she feels for parents of those who died, but voices out that the courtroom must rely more on facts, evidence, and cross-examine all parties instead of completely focusing on Silkroad founder.

Ross wasn’t allowed to defend himself, and Silkroad witnesses were muzzled as the judge totally refused to hear their side of the Silkroad story.

Nowhere in the law does it state that a harsher punishment is imperative for the first offender in any case.

Also, Shaun Bridges was clearly empowered over the Silkroad site, and evidence manipulation has been proven twice now.

The prosecution has utterly ignored this along with the unabashed mishandling of the Silkroad case.

These actions coming from the government has led many to believe that the US justice system has failed.

Also considering that it relies on digital evidence, pertaining to that which can easily be forged, is one thing that’s actually troubling when looking at future convictions.

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Silk Road Online

It was a different time for Darknet marketplaces back in 2013. The whole idea of a centralized marketplace for something like drugs was not as accepted as it is today, at least not until Silk Road stepped up to the plate.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

Silk Road and Dread Pirate Roberts

DPRSilk Road was the first “real” drug marketplace on Darknet and one of the pioneers of the idea that drugs could be sold and bought over the internet anonymously. It was established by a man called Ross Ulbricht, known to many as “Dread Pirate Roberts” and his associates. Aside from the fact that this was the first Darknet Marketplace of this size, what separated it from other contenders at that time was Dread Pirate Roberts’ philosophy of standing up against the system and proving that drug consumption and trafficking can be done peacefully and safely. One of the main reasons for Silk Road’s existence at that time was to allow people who wanted to purchase illegal drugs, to do so without fearing for their safety.

The Bust

This went on until October 2nd, 2013 when an FBI Seizure Notice replaced the usual Silkroad login screen. Shortly after that, different speculations started circling the Darknet about what was the full story behind this. Most prominent theories were that either Dread Pirate Roberts was arrested, or he ran off with everyone’s money. There were some who still clung to hope that this was just a prank pulled by the site’s admins, but this was soon dispelled by the confirmation of the news that Ross Ulbricht has been arrested on the charges pertaining to running Silk Road.

What followed after could be very well described as a fall of a nation. Mass panic among the Darknet community ensued and many people were justifiably worried about their personal data and whether it was safe. Luckily, most of the buyers from Silkroad were not persecuted but were left with a difficult situation nonetheless. What was to be done now? Without Silk Road where will they purchase the goods that were so readily available to them just a few days ago?

Aftermath

People, who will in time be called “Silk Road refugees,” now had to find a new marketplace that will replace the hole that the site left. This was a period of many scams, one of the most well-known ones being the Sheep Marketplace scam. On the flip side, after the owner of Sheep Marketplace disappeared with estimated 40 million dollars in Bitcoin, a post appeared on the front page of Sheep Marketplace with several .onion links directing to other “trustworthy” marketplaces. The result of this was that not only Sheep Marketplace was shut down due to exit scam, but TorMarket and Black Market Reloaded also had to turn into invite-only marketplaces because their servers could not handle the sudden influx of people from Silk Road and Sheep Marketplace.

Silk Road 2.0

After the fall of Silkroad, some of the admins and prominent vendors refused to “give up” and decided to revive the site as it once was. The alias “Dread Pirate Roberts” was picked up by one of the well-known vendors from the site StExo. He then met with several mods and admins from the site to discuss its revival and even posted a notice on Silkroad forums telling Dread Pirate Roberts to contact him as soon as possible. Many speculated that this was an attempt to make the authorities believe they have a wrong person, or at least that “Dread Pirate Roberts” was not a single person, to begin with.

The Crew

Ross UlbrichtAfter establishing himself as a successor to Dread Pirate Roberts, StExo rallied a group of now-former Silkroad admins and decided that their first course of action was to create a new place of gathering for Silkroad refugees. The people assisting StExo were accurately described as “a colorful bunch,” but they all shared the idea that Silk Road was not dead for good.

Among the group was Scout, a former moderator of Silkroad forum, who was well known and well liked by the community, but had a history of “betraying his captain.” He has been discovered by Dread Pirate Roberts to be conspiring with an undercover federal agent to create a vendor account in an attempt to infiltrate Silk Road. He was laid off because of this and later reinstated just to be fired again, followed by another reinstatement under a different moniker.

Another part of the crew was a person known under the name Same Same But Different (SSBD), who was allegedly Dread Pirate Roberts’ most loyal confidant.

The last person to assist in the creation of Silk Road 2.0 was the former forum administrator Libertas. He was known as “Gestapo,” but nonetheless his seal of approval was what finally got people to rally to Silkroad 2.0’s forum.

Sometime after the creation of Silk Road 2.0 forum, StExo posted under his moniker that while he approves of the site’s forum, will never trust a marketplace opened under the name of someone else’s idea. This was, of course, arouse created to distance StExo from the entire operation.

In November 2013 the new Silk Road 2.0 marketplace opened for business, which was a direct taunt to the authorities. By now any possibility of Silk Road’s staff being on authorities’ radar has been dismissed, and the admins of Silkroad continued using their old monikers.

The problem was that Silkroad 2.0 was a huge taunt to the competence of agencies fighting the War on Drugs and those same agencies held Ross Ulbricht and all data stored on his personal laptop. Unfortunately, that data included personal information on SSBD, Libertas, and Inigo, who were arrested and charged for involvement with Silk Road and Silk Road 2.0. After this, StExo disappeared, but the allure of potential profit that Silkroad offered was too great. He returned under a different name, Defcon, and fabricated a story that would explain the current state of events.

Shortly after, Silkroad 2.0 was allegedly hacked and around 4 thousand Bitcoins were stolen. A post was placed on the site’s forum that contained personal information of said hacker, which later turned out to be fabricated. The accepted explanation is that StExo realized that it is no longer safe running the site and thus decided to run away with all the Bitcoin that was in escrow at the time.

Silk Road 3.0

Following the fall of Silk Road 2.0, a large majority of Darknet has started to shun the name and associate it with scamming. The name that once signified the battle against the War on Drugs is now nothing more than a shade of its former self. Given this, it is unusual, to say the least, that a small but relatively prominent marketplace called Diabolus Marketplace, decided last year to change their name into Silk Road 3.0 following the closure of its second iteration. The site has not only changed its name but has also actively rebranded itself to resemble Silk Road. The owner of the site has also admitted in an interview that they are working with a senior member from older Silk Roads to create the Silk Road 3.0. This has caused the majority of Darknet community to question the trustworthiness of the site and many people went as far as to claim that “you have to be retarded to put money into any site that has Silk Road in its name” and that “Silk Road era is done.” Even sites like DeepDotWeb are warning their users that any further Silkroad iterations are not to be trusted and will probably end up scamming their users. While the Silkroad 3.0 is still up and running, and quite well if one looks at the amount of listings posted on it, there is no telling how it will end and who the people are running it behind the scenes.

Silk Road Reloaded

As with Silk Road 3.0, Silk Road Reloaded was another marketplace that tried to cash in on the name. It got an even worse treatment than Silkroad 3.0, mainly because its admin acted very weirdly, even rudely in some cases, and was considered to be a troll by a majority of Darknet community. An interesting thing about the site is that it was based on i2p rather than Tor, which earned it a lot of side glances from Darknet community. It also had its inbuilt crypto-currency converter, meaning it was accepting payments in a currency other than Bitcoin, which was converted automatically by the site. It has been ten months since any news was heard from the site, which probably means that the marketplace has been shut down for one reason or another.

Future of Silk Road

While Silk Road 3.0 still stands and operates normally, many people who have been visiting Darknet marketplaces for a longer period are appealing to the newer users to steer clear of Silkroad brand. The name itself has been too heavily connected to scamming and foul play, making the majority of users decides on other sites as their source of business. And with the recent increase in personal vendor marketplaces which have proven to be much safer and trustworthy, centralized markets like Silkroad 3.0 are getting less and fewer visitors every day. It is possible that it will be the last real iteration of Silk Road since the name has started to bring more bad publicity than anything else.

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Former Silk Road Employee Granted A Blue Card

A man named Peter Philip Nash was put in jail because of his involvement with the online drug marketplace called the Silk Road. He has reportedly won an appeal that he had filed for obtaining a blue card in Brisbane. He was extradited to the US from Brisbane in 2013 after he was charged¬ with conspiracy to money laundering and committing narcotics trafficking. The Silk Road website with which he was associated generated over $200 million in sales through the sale of illicit goods.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

Peter NashPeter Nash pleaded guilty but said that he had bought illicit as well as controlled substances through the Silk Road website for his personal use. He was later on contacted by the operators of the Silk Road website to work as the moderator of an associated chat forum. He confirmed that he worked for ten months as the moderator of this chat forum.

Nash also said that he received his salary in bitcoins and used approximately $25,000 he earned for buying drugs on the Silk Road for his personal use. He was sentenced to 17 months in jail on 26th May 2015 and was subsequently released from custody.

Peter Nash had shifted base to Brisbane and was working in an adult forensic disability services center before he was arrested in 2011. He wanted to return to Brisbane and work in the field of providing services to people with challenging behavior and intellectual disabilities. He did succeed in securing a job in his chosen field but was informed about the cancellation of his blue card. Though he applied once again, the Public Safety Business Agency (PSBA) informed him that he was not eligible for the blue card.

Peter Nash then made an appeal to the Civil and Administrative Tribunal in Queensland. On reviewing the history of Nash, the Tribunal found out that he had been using drugs for recreational purposes in his 20s and 30s, but started self-medication since 2011 to cope with stress at his workplace.

Peter Nash 2Nash had taken steps to get rid of his drug addiction weeks ahead of his arrest and used his time in prison to complete drug abuse education, treatment, and rehabilitation. He even completed a stress management course.

A report on Peter Nash, given by an independent psychologist noted that the offending behavior of Nash could be attributed to social isolation (there was no support network when he came to Brisbane for the very first time) and workplace stress. The psychologist also noted that he was never a direct threat and posed a low risk as far as children are concerned. Peter Nash’s character witness submissions pointed out that he was a role model during his tenure with forensic disability services.

Though the tribunal determined that the sobriety of Peter Nash was in its infancy (2.5 years), the chances of a relapse were considered to be low because of the ongoing support arrangements and plans. Member Howard said that he was fully satisfied with Nash’s case because of the life-changing experience that he had gone through. He concluded that the right action in Nash’s case would be to set aside the ruling of PSBA and substitute it with a favorable decision and issue a blue card to him.

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Ex-Silk Road Secret Service Agent Alleged Of Additional Thefts

Shaun Bridges, one of two ex-US feds accused of going rogue during the Silkroad investigation, the other being former DEA agent Carl Force. Both were members of Baltimore Silkroad Task Force who abused their roles and former Silkroad Secret Service agent Shaun Bridges dauntlessly pursued even more alleged corrupt acts linked to the Bitcoin cryptocurrency.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

Silkroad Theft

Silkroad TheftFormer Secret Service agent Bridges pleaded guilty in August last year to money laundering and obstruction of justice, in connection with Bitcoin theft during the investigation of the most sought after online black market at the time, the Silkroad.

Upon admitting that he stole approximately 20,000 Silkroad Bitcoins amounting to about $350,000 back then, he was sentenced in the month of December to nearly 6 years in prison. It was between March and May 2013 that he liquidated the digital currency into $820,000 and transferred funds to his personal investment accounts.

Bridges confessed that he stole money from Silkroad underground drug bazaar accounts, and framed someone else for it. The witty frame-up act had led to Silkroad creator and operator, Ross William Ulbricht, to contract a murder for the thief. Ulbricht, aka “Dread Pirate Roberts,” ended up guilty of charges and is currently serving life in prison sentence.

Two-fold Stolen Bitcoin Cases

4Bitcoins have been allegedly stolen by Shaun Bridges in two other different instances. How he managed to do so after having been initially arrested and the fact that he already pled guilty to online dark market Silkroad related charges is an interesting controversy.

Apart from stealing the Silkroad money seized by the government, Bridges is alleged man behind the theft of an estimated $700,000 worth of Bitcoins sourced from a Secret Service account. This occurrence is noted three months after his access was supposed to be blocked.

Unsealed court filings indicated that the Justice Department unraveled last April the possibility of Bridges holding a private cryptographic key. If he had, it would have granted him easy access to a Bitcoin wallet wherein the $700,000 worth of Bitcoins seized by the Silkroad task force was stored.

The department states that they have urged to block his access, but unfortunately was not done by the U.S. Secret Service. Thus, the funds were stolen and something that would have been overlooked if not with the court order to pay a portion of Bitcoin seized back to its claimants.

According to federal prosecutors, the government is running an ongoing investigation of determining if Bridges executed theft of approximately $700,000 on July 28th, only to be followed by more stealing of $20,000 Bitcoins on September 10th of 2015.

It can be noted how the document does not definitively state that the suspected former Silkroad Secret Service agent indeed took the money; however, prosecutors tell of the only individual conclusively known to have access, is no other than Shaun Bridges.

In February, right on the day before he was up to start serving his prison sentence, Bridges’ second arrest was accomplished at his Laurel, Maryland home. Officers found luggage containing a notarized copy of his passport, records for three offshore account, bulletproof vests that were issued by the Secret Service and probably stolen, which altogether appearing to be items for use in an attempt flee the country.

Currently, Bridges is in detention at the Terre Haute, Indiana prison. The Secret Service and his lawyer Steven Levin chose not to comment.

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Curtis Green Is Back With His “Silk Road Memoir”

Curtis Green, also known as “chronicpain” in the dark web was an administrator of the black marketplace, Silk Road. He was in the news earlier as being the one that the website founder Ross Ulbricht was accused of attempting to murder. Well, he is back in the news once again and this time round, it is for his book. Green was arrested in 2013 with $27,000. In the months following Curtis’ arrest, the police had tightened the noose around the website and its owner as he had decided to cooperate with the law enforcement agencies and turned on Ross and the website during the progress of the case. Ross Ulbricht has purportedly paid $80,000 to have Green killed.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

Curtis Green – The Background

ross ulbrichtRoss Ulbricht founded the darknet drug marketplace Silk Road in 2011. It soon grew into a billion dollar business. The Silk Road was pulled down in 2013 by the law enforcement agencies, and Ross Ulbricht was arrested on charges of money laundering, hacking, identity fraud, and drug trafficking. He was convicted in 2015, and his lawyers are currently looking to file a second appeal for a retrial of the case.

According to the law enforcement agencies, Ross believed that Curtis Green, an employee of Silk Road, had stolen money from the website. Ulbricht purportedly wanted Green killed and ordered a hit. However, Carl Mark Force, a law enforcement agent that worked closely with Green masqueraded as the hitman. He pretended to kill Curtis and even sent staged photos of the hit. It was later known that Agent Force himself was stealing money from the website. Curtis Green had, in fact, taught the agents how to use Bitcoins, the digital currency that was accepted by the website.

Force and another agent Shaun Bridges were convicted last year on charges of blackmail and theft. The defense argued that it was not Ross Ulbricht, but someone else operating under the name of “Dread Pirate Roberts” who ordered Curtis’ murder.

Curtis Green – The Book of Memoirs

Curtis GreenCurtis Green is now writing a book with all the happenings at the Silk Road website that culminated in his arrest. Curtis is currently looking for a different kind of cover art for his book. Curtis Green’s book is not the first one on the topic, though. There are already many works published about the website including a book called Silk Road by Eileen Ormsby, a documentary by the name of Deep Web, and a full-length feature film among others.

Curtis Green did not serve any time for a felony in prison and was served only with a light sentence because he turned against the website and Ross and cooperated with the law enforcement agencies. He has also been working closely with journalists and writers as well as 20th Century Fox during the trial of Ross Ulbricht.

The book by Curtis Green is named Silk Road Memoir: A Story of Crime, Greed, and Murder will be released in the near future, and a Hollywood movie on the topic is also scheduled to be released soon.

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Battle between Microsoft and the US Gov. Related to Silk Road Emails

The long-running battle between the tech giant Microsoft and the US government is over government’s access to an Irishman’s emails, which are purportedly related to Silkroad investigation. The emails stored in servers on Ireland have become the center of controversy as Gary Davis was accused of being part of the now defunct illegal online drugs black market Silkroad as an administrator.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

microsoft-email-battler-silk-roadAccording to the report, the said email account belonged to the 28-year old alleged Silkroad administrator, Gary Davis, from Wicklow, Ireland. The report also noted that the federal investigators filed a warrant in 2013 seeking access to his emails. Currently, he is fighting a legal battle to prevent extradition to the U.S. on charges that he operated as a Silkroad administrator. Though Davis appeared in a court in Dublin recently in this connection, the case has been adjourned to 8th July.

The online drug marketplace Silkroad, which was shut down in 2013 by the law enforcement authorities, operated on the dark web using the hidden service Tor so that users could buy illegal items such as drugs, fake documents, and weapons anonymously. The creator of Silkroad, Ross Ulbricht, has been served a life sentence after he was found guilty of charges including money laundering, conspiracy to drug trafficking, and computer hacking.

Paul Ennis, a researcher at the Center for Innovation, Technology and Organization of the University College Dublin, reportedly said that the U.S. government would not upset an ally like Microsoft or the country Ireland. This was happening only because of the embarrassment caused by Silkroad.

Ddavisavis himself provided further evidence when he tweeted that he feels that the battle between Microsoft and the U.S. government is centered on his emails, linking to the Silkroad case.

The battle between the tech major and the federal government can be traced back to December 2013 when District Court in the U.S. passed a judgment in connection with the Silkroad case, compelling Microsoft to hand over the emails belonging to a person whose nationality was not known but was suspected to be a drug trafficker.

Microsoft promptly handed over the information (not related to content) that had been stored on their servers in the U.S. but refrained from handing over the emails, saying that the federal government did not possess the rights to access content that is stored on servers located outside the U.S.

The Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in the U.S. is currently considering the case and the privacy advocates and technology companies are eagerly awaiting judgment in the case related to Silkroad investigations. In this connection, it is important to note that other technology companies have filed amicus briefs like Apple, Verizon, AT&T, Amazon and Cisco in support of Microsoft. The ACLU, the Irish government, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have also backed the stance taken by Microsoft.

E. Joshua Rosenkranz, the lawyer representing Microsoft in this case about Silkroad investigation, cited an opinion of the Supreme that was issued in another case that would back up its argument that the U.S. laws are not applicable outside the country unless it has been explicitly provided for by the Congress.

It is expected that the court would give its ruling on the Silkroad related case sometime next month. However, it is also anticipated that the losing side is likely to appeal the ruling in the Supreme Court.

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Silk-Road-Related Auction Partly Accountable For Drop In Bitcoin Price

Bitcoin recently took a huge hit across exchanges, falling below $700 in a significant 10% dip in recent price advances. The crash culprit? Bitfinex timeout and an auction that’s linked to the Silk Road, amounting to about $19 million.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

From as high as $760 over the weekend last week, the Bitcoin price tumbled down to a lowly $698 come Monday, June 20th. This drastic occurrence of the BTC/USD price plunge is thought to be due to the Bitfinex trading outage and auctioning off massive Silk Road-related Bitcoins in Australia.

Bitfinex Unscheduled Downtime

Bitfinex Unscheduled DowntimeBitfinex is a fast-growing worldwide exchange, achieving its position among the highest ranks regarding of raw trading volume. The Bitcoin exchange holds the biggest USD trading volume at 37% of all their trades in USD.

Despite the leading Bitcoin trading platform’s scheduled maintenance done on the 17thof the month, which lasted for approximately an hour, trading was paused starting around 5PM Eastern Time. Bitfinex cited “server migration issues” as the main source of the maintenance delay, compromising their projected re-launch a couple of times. This allowed bursts of cancellation requests while they were attempting to fix the issue.

The initial update stated that they were recovering from the internal network issue, followed by an identified status revealing an ongoing investigation of a trading-impactful infrastructure issue and likewise clarifying that it did not involve funds or system security. Another update showed an investigating status as they are experiencing platform problems, altogether coming with the assurance of resuming operations in the soonest possible time.

The downtime continued to the night causing a lot of panic and several Bitcoin traders’ dismay, with some having lost their investments since deals could not be closed, and considering the millions involved in Silk Road-related auction. It went up again by 9:50, but had to be taken down again on June 21stdue to instability in the network within their data center, letting traders know that they are working with their hosting provider during this second halt on Bitfinex services.

Australian Auction

australia-bitcoin-auction-dinbits-2016June 20th marks the same day of the flooding of $19 million Bitcoins in an Australian auction associated with the Silk Road. These are proceeds of the crime connected to the closure of the Silk Road drug marketplace and Ross Ulbricht’s conviction in 2015, forming part of the civil forfeiture of Silk Road Bitcoins. Bidders of the 48-hour sealed auction include digital asset managers, digital currency exchanges, mostly American and European investment banks as well as hedge funds.

A Reminder

The outage that could have been triggered by the vastness of Silk Road Bitcoins in an Australian auction was only temporary but served as a reminder of Bitcoin’s volatility amidst its growth. Bitfinex has since reemerged online and trading exchanges are resumed.

Prices and volume are expected to increase once again to their pre-outage levels and continuously recovering from the uncertainty. Bitcoin price showed signs of immediate recovery with a strong sell-off, albeit would go a long way for several more weeks especially with traders exhibiting cautiousness and giving more attention to detail and potential risks.

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Re-Trial for Ross Ulbricht Not Looking Good

Silkroad founder, Ross Ulbricht, has been in prison since May 2015 after he was given a double life sentence without the possibility of parole. Ulbricht was charged on many counts, such as money laundering, conspiracy to sell drugs, and for creating and running Silkroad – a dark web site that enables its users to sell and buy drugs. While administrating the Silkroad website, Ulbricht used “Dread Pirate Roberts” as his pseudonym.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

images (2)A year on, Ulbricht, his mother Lyn, and his defense team are working on an appeal for a re-trial. Lyn Ulbricht filed an appeal for a re-trial of the case in what she and the defense team believes that the double life sentence given to her son was unjust. The 170-page argument that the defense team presented is Ulbricht’s final hope of escaping a double life sentence that he is now serving at the Metropolitan Correctional Center, NY. They filed the appeal on January 12, this year, and a reply was received from the government on June 17.
Their most important refutation concerns the argument over the role of the two corrupt agents who ended up using their roles in the Silkroad investigation to steal and extort money from Ross Ulbricht, and whose participation was kept undisclosed from the jury, and to some degree even from Silkroad founder defense team during his trial.

ross-ulbrichtUlbricht’s defense argues that the evidence revealing the corrupt federal agents had unfettered, high-level admin access to Silkroad; and the power to remove, add, and change material to the website; as well as pocket over a million US dollars, was covered up, and the jury was not allowed to know it.

Not only was the evidence tainted, but was kept unknown until after the trial was over. Silkroad founder defense team argues that the action is against the law and a direct violation of the “Brady Rule.” This is one of the major issues it has addressed in the appeal, but there are several weighty challenges to the Silkroad investigation and trial.

But, his re-trial doesn’t look as though it is going to be good as the prosecution team has now hit back with its own, equally large document refuting each and every one of those arguments.

In its 186-page document presented on the evening of June 17, the prosecution rehashed much of Ross’ 11-day trial in 2015 and defended repeated decisions by District Court Judge Katherine Forrest in its favor – a series of moves to deny defense witnesses, clamp down on defense evidence, and admit its evidence that led his lawyers to call for a mistrial not less than five instances.

Initial efforts by Ulbricht’s lawyers to take the case to court were earlier on thwarted by Judge Katherine Forrest in March. In her memo back then, Judge Forrest shot down a series of arguments presented by Ulbricht’s defense team including the corruption charges that were slapped on former Secret Service agent Shaun Bridges and former DEA agent Carl Mark Force.

The two allegedly blackmailed Ulbricht and ended up extorting thousands of dollars from Silkroad. The defense team also pointed out that the period allocated to them for reviewing the evidence was not sufficient. The defense also cited unfair, denying Fifth Amendment rights for their client during the Silkroad hearing.

However, the argument by the defense that it was completely kept in the dark regarding Carl Mark Force’s misbehavior till the trial was concluded, and was not also told about the role that Shaun Bridges played doesn’t look good for Ross Ulbricht’s re-trial. In its latest hit-back, the prosecution argues that any disclosure it should have made as regards Silkroad investigation is irrelevant because Bridges’ and Force’s behavior had nothing to do with challenging Silkroad founder’s guilt.

They continue to argue that his appeal based on the corruption of the two federal agents doesn’t add up for the simple reason that, be that as it may, Ulbricht hasn’t explained how the information he pursued to admit or compel was exculpatory. Nowhere does Ross Ulbricht explain how Shaun Bridges and Carl Mark Force’s Silkroad crimes impeach the prosecution’s “overwhelming” evidence.

The 186-page prosecution document includes a laundry list of very compelling evidence against the Silkroad founder that it argues has no any relation to the two corrupt federal agents. That critical proof includes records of transactions on a bitcoin public ledger referred to as the “blockchain” that traces $18 million bitcoins sent from the Silkroad servers to his laptop, a journal and logbook found on that laptop, and FBI agents catching Ross Ulbricht red-handed in a library in San Francisco, logged into Silkroad as its administrator, even gaining access to a so-called “mastermind” page. Ulbricht’s defense team has so far declined to comment on the rebuttal by the prosecution.

And even though Ulbricht’s defense lawyers have argued that Force or Bridge used their illegal access to Silkroad to tamper somehow with its account or even plant evidence on the laptop, the prosecution has responded by stating that the Silkroad staff account that was hijacked from an informant by Shaun Bridges did not actually have the “root” access crucial for that sort of tampering.

It also goes on to argue that the defense knew about the crimes that Force committed on Silkroad to the extent that if it had suspected some evidence-planting on Ross Ulbricht’s laptop, it ought to have tried to demonstrate foul play during the trial.

In fact, Ross Ulbricht’s defense lawyers did make arguments that evidence-planting could have been possible on his laptop through a BitTorrent connection, but the prosecution appeared to proof that bogus to the jury. Prosecutor Serrin Turner has stated that there was nothing that was planted on Ulbricht’s laptop to affect the Silkroad case.

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Silk Road 3.0 – Back Online and Open For Business

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Silk Road 3 has come back from the grave! The third iteration of the famous brand darknet market has surprised everyone and returned from the ashes and is open for business.

It appears that Silk Road brand has been on a bumpy road in its journey to deliver a free and open marketplace – every marketplace on the Deep Web trying to replicate the success of the original SR doesn’t last. The last that was thought to suffer from that fate was Silk Road 3.0 earlier this year. Round the end of January.

>> Click here to find the updated Silk Road 3 Guide <<

It went down reportedly on account of some maintenance issues, after being DDoS attacked on several occasions. Of course, this stirred a lot of emotions and speculations among the users, and some have even gone so far as to claim the Silk Road 3.0 performed an exit scam on its users. Well, can’t you blame them – as it is so often the case.

Anyway, apparently people that thought that it was just a plain exit scam couldn’t be more wrong, because believe it or not – Silk Road 3.0 has been re-launched and running since Saturday, May 7th. Personally, I believe this must be a precedent of some sorts because – no Silk Road that had ever gone down for that long and for any reason, has ever come back online!

Another interesting fact is that Silk Road 3.0 and Crypto Market are both run by the same admins. Even earlier than when Silk Road 3.0 went down, Crypto Market went down for security upgrades as well and came back again. And, in the last couple of months – Crypto Market has become one of the most secure markets on the Deep Web.

If judging by the market’s admins, we are to expect an even more secure SR 3.0; perhaps even the safest marketplace on the entire Deep Web! Allegedly, admins have lost a ton of coins, from lost revenue when they took the website down, but the only conclusion we could draw from this whole affair is that they apparently value their users’ security more than quick cash. This is a very good indication of the intentions of the admins.

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Silk Road Here to Stay
According to the recent, quite dramatic, events on the Deep Web, the Silk Road brand is still far from dead. We have been witnesses of many Silk Roads coming and going; yet it is still THE most popular market name on the Darknet.

Just as a reminder, the original Silk Road was created by Ross Ulbricht, Dread Pirate Roberts, who took drug related ‘business’ to a whole new level and gave wings to hundreds of Darknet Markets that appeared soon after his own.

Ulbricht was a man of principle (or so people say) – he didn’t allow child pornography or weapons on his market, and the users appreciated this. Perhaps this is the reason it is so well loved.
After his arrest and downfall of the original market, many have tried to re-create the success he had achieved using the name Silk Road; so much, so it became a brand. We saw SR 2.0 (created and run by the rest of Ulbricht’s team), Silk Road Reloaded, etc.

It just goes to show that it will be impossible to kill the Silkroad brand; it has become an idea, a community, a following; and not just a mere website or marketplace everyone is nostalgic about.
We have already gotten used to SR setting standards on the Deep Web; and since this must be the very first silkroad market that came back from the dead – we believe it’s safe to say that we are to expect new levels in standards regarding users’ safety from this Silk Road 3.0.

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Silk Road 2.0 Key Player Gets 8 Years In Prison

Seattle. June 3rd, 2016. Brian Farrell, operating Silk Road 2.0 under the alias “DoctorClu,” was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Richard Jones to 8 years in prison as filed under case No. 15-mj-00016.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

Benthall and UlbrichtFounder of the original Silk Road underground drug marketplace in early 2011, Ross Ulbricht aka “Dread Pirate Roberts,” was sentenced to life in prison back in May 2015. The second version of the site was launched in November 2013 weeks after authorities had shut down the original darknet site and seized its creator.

Blake Benthall, the alleged operator of Silk Road 2.0 known as “Defcon,” was arrested in the year 2014 but denied creating the successor darknet site. However, its second-in-command staff administrator has admitted to the charges against him.

Key Player Unlocked

Silk Road 2.0Brian Farrell was arrested in January 2015, and during the search, federal agents discovered three handguns, drug paraphernalia, a myriad of prescription medications, computer media, 20 silver bullion bars with a $3,900 monetary value and cash amounting to $35,000. The silver and dollar evidence will be forfeited to the government in addition to the prison sentence.

He admitted his involvement with the second iteration of the darknet site when the authorities searched his Washington home ensuing Operation Onymous, an international crackdown that targeted suspected illicit marketplaces and various other Tor hidden services in the darknet.

The sentence followed months after he pleaded guilty to conspiracy in the distribution of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine in March this year. These charges typically carry a minimum term of 5 years in prison.

The Department of Justice revealed in a 2015 press release that Silk Road 2.0 has amassed approximately $8 million generated sales per month. It had around 150,000 users who were granted the freedom to buy anonymously and sell illicit goods and services including drugs and computer hacking tools using the digital currency bitcoin.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Woods has stated that the Silk Road is a threat to public safety and health, as the platform expands a serious drug market throughout the country and the world. In line with this is a clear message from the government that such cyber crimes are bound to be faced with serious penalties.

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