Former Silk Road Employee Granted A Blue Card

A man named Peter Philip Nash was put in jail because of his involvement with the online drug marketplace called the Silk Road. He has reportedly won an appeal that he had filed for obtaining a blue card in Brisbane. He was extradited to the US from Brisbane in 2013 after he was charged¬ with conspiracy to money laundering and committing narcotics trafficking. The Silk Road website with which he was associated generated over $200 million in sales through the sale of illicit goods.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road 3.0 is BACK ONLINE and open for business. The team did a massive security overhaul on the site to try and make it more secure and anonymous.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.0 Guide <<

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Peter NashPeter Nash pleaded guilty but said that he had bought illicit as well as controlled substances through the Silk Road website for his personal use. He was later on contacted by the operators of the Silk Road website to work as the moderator of an associated chat forum. He confirmed that he worked for ten months as the moderator of this chat forum.

Nash also said that he received his salary in bitcoins and used approximately $25,000 he earned for buying drugs on the Silk Road for his personal use. He was sentenced to 17 months in jail on 26th May 2015 and was subsequently released from custody.

Peter Nash had shifted base to Brisbane and was working in an adult forensic disability services center before he was arrested in 2011. He wanted to return to Brisbane and work in the field of providing services to people with challenging behavior and intellectual disabilities. He did succeed in securing a job in his chosen field but was informed about the cancellation of his blue card. Though he applied once again, the Public Safety Business Agency (PSBA) informed him that he was not eligible for the blue card.

Peter Nash then made an appeal to the Civil and Administrative Tribunal in Queensland. On reviewing the history of Nash, the Tribunal found out that he had been using drugs for recreational purposes in his 20s and 30s, but started self-medication since 2011 to cope with stress at his workplace.

Peter Nash 2Nash had taken steps to get rid of his drug addiction weeks ahead of his arrest and used his time in prison to complete drug abuse education, treatment, and rehabilitation. He even completed a stress management course.

A report on Peter Nash, given by an independent psychologist noted that the offending behavior of Nash could be attributed to social isolation (there was no support network when he came to Brisbane for the very first time) and workplace stress. The psychologist also noted that he was never a direct threat and posed a low risk as far as children are concerned. Peter Nash’s character witness submissions pointed out that he was a role model during his tenure with forensic disability services.

Though the tribunal determined that the sobriety of Peter Nash was in its infancy (2.5 years), the chances of a relapse were considered to be low because of the ongoing support arrangements and plans. Member Howard said that he was fully satisfied with Nash’s case because of the life-changing experience that he had gone through. He concluded that the right action in Nash’s case would be to set aside the ruling of PSBA and substitute it with a favorable decision and issue a blue card to him.

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