Murder-For-Hire Indictment Against Silk Road Founder to Be Dismissed

The Free Ross movement has been working tirelessly over the past few years to overturn the life sentencing of Silk Road founder Ross Ulbricht.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road is BACK ONLINE NOW as Silk Road 3.1 and open for business. The team did a change and upgrade for a reason we can only assume for security.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.1 Guide <<

5
Indictment Law Concept 3D Illustration
The murder-for-hire charge that possibly decided the case against Ross Ulbricht years ago has been officially dismissed.

Despite being dealt a fatal blow in recent years, the movement celebrated a bittersweet victory last week after the prosecution filed a motion to drop the final murder-for-hire charge against Ulbricht.

Ulbricht was initially slapped with six murder-for-hire charges, five of which never made it to court. The sixth charge involved his former partner and has now been dismissed with prejudice, giving the 34-year-old a sliver of hope to hang on to as he serves out his life sentence at the USP Florence Maximum Security Prison in Colorado.

U.S. Attorney for the District of Maryland Robert Hur filed the motion last week and later stated that the decision to drop the murder-for-hire charges was based on a need to reallocate resources to cases that needed them.

Ulbricht’s Story & the Movement to Free Him

Although Ulbricht was arrested and imprisoned for running the darknet-based marketplace Silk Road, he was put behind bars over charges of money laundering, conspiracy to traffic narcotics, hacking and conspiracy to commit murder.

At the time, the last charge was described as “the procurement of murder” as Ulbricht faced the consequences of a fake hit on a former Silk Road site administrator, Curtis Green.

Following the dismissal of the final murder-for-hire charge, it is evident that the prosecutor did not believe any of the six charges were valid.

The official dismissal of this damaging charge has given Ross Ulbricht’s mother, Lyn Ulbricht, a reason to hope—although not even the movement has been able to pry Ulbricht away from his life sentence.

Ulbricht’s Future

A gavel on an american flag with a gun and bullets in the background, focus on the gavel.
Despite being dealt a fatal blow in recent years, the movement celebrated a bittersweet victory last week after the prosecution filed a motion to drop the final murder-for-hire charge against Ulbricht.

Mixed reactions followed the announcement of the charge dismissal as joyous supporters realized that Ulbricht may still very well spend his life in prison.

Following his failed appeal to the Supreme Court in June, Ulbricht was effectively denied the chance to overturn the ruling dished out by the U.S. attorney’s office for the Southern District of New York over three years ago.

The six charges played a massive part in convincing the jury to rule against Ulbricht even though none of them had been proven in court.

Their dismissal now could be interpreted as the federal government surrendering its ace card because there is no longer the looming threat of Ulbricht walking free.

Indeed, many believe that Ulbricht’s sentencing was a deliberately excessive penalty by the federal government, judging by the extreme sentence that was doled out.

Indeed, previous reevaluations of the case have all produced the same answer: the life sentence handed to Ulbricht for forming and running the Silk Road was too heavy-handed a punishment.

Still, despite the bleakness of the situation, belief is firm among his supporters that the quest to free Ulbricht will ultimately be answered.

Although the judicial system can do nothing to reinstate the freedom of the man formerly known as Dread Pirate Roberts, hopes of a presidential pardon are what the movement is banking on to get the iconic darknet market founder into the free world.