Silk Road 3.1 is Back Up

Enter DarkNet
Silk Road 3.1 has miraculously come back online. Will the great darkweb market flourish or flounder?

Yes, you heard this correctly, Silk Road 3.1 is back up and even refunding users lost bitcoins!

The main reason why the original Silk Road closed down in the first place was that the site’s fund transfer program was not working.

As such, many users supposed one of the mods had stopped maintaining the market, possibly subjecting to an exit scam.

However, the other two mods working on the Silk Road continued to work on a new market, named Silk Road 3.1. They have been trying to refund all of the lost funds.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road is BACK ONLINE NOW as Silk Road 3.1 and open and trading all the goods you are looking for.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.1 Guide <<

There’s even an available form on the site where you can recover your lost funds if you prove your identity and provide the necessary evidence.

Furthermore, shortly after this announcement, another incident came along. Users’ funds were stolen after the site’s servers had been hacked. Most of the users were let down, and despite all attempts of the Silk Road to make a positive impression and gain a certain reputation, most of the people were frightened of the name of Silk Road 3.1.

The dark market community was truly divided on this topic. Many considered that the owners of SR3.1 pulled off a big exit scam. By extension, they also believed that the announcement of the hacking was an enormous lie.

Expert hacker doing a criminal cyber-attacks
Many considered that the owners of SR3.1 pulled off a big exit scam.

Still, many comrades believe that a third party was responsible for this incident and the owners of the Silk Road 3.1 were honorable members of the darknet market community.

After a certain time has passed, I am glad to tell you the Silk Road 3.1 is back up! Subsequently resolving some technical issues, the Silk Road market has risen again as of August 1.

The comeback of the Silk Road 3.1 brought much more obligations to the owners of this market—mainly showing their reliability and trustworthiness to the site’s vendors and buyers.

The ultimate goal is to prove their loyalty in order to win their previous users again. Every doubt any of the users has is justified and upheld, so all that is left for the Silk Road 3.1 and its owners is to confirm the market’s decency and correctness.

It is only a matter of time when Silk Road 3.1’s administrators will prove their dedication to their comrades.

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Silk Road 3.1 Closed Down

After an incident revolving around Silk Road 3 happened in early 2017, a post on DarknetMarkets subreddit emerged, explaining what has allegedly happened to the market, and the reasons behind it.

The post was written by one of the SR3 mods, who was working on SR3 and who tried to rectify some of the harm that was caused.

NOTE: Silk Road 3.1 was supposedly HACKED and the owners temporarily closed it down. It is now back up and operational. In recent weeks, AlphaBay and Hansa markets were seized by law enforcement so they are also gone.

You must keep your identity safe, so always use a VPN and PGP, and never use your real email or name. Happy Trails.

Closed sign. Realistic neon inscription. Glowing font. Vector illustration.
A hacker has allegedly infiltrated the Silk Road 3.1 and Luancy marketplaces, stealing users’ funds. An announcement has been posted on the sites.

In the continuation of the post, the mod who goes by the name AlphaWaves claims that another mod called BattleStar was starting to become paranoid and had stopped working for the marketplace—causing the cessation of fund transfers.

After that, the darknet market was proclaimed to have underwent an exit scam, and it was supposedly closed.

While this was all happening, AlphaWaves and a third mod from SR3, named Paragon, started working on a new marketplace called Silk Road 3.1.

In the initial post, AlphaWaves claimed that all the funds that were locked on SR3 servers were still up on the site, and the team would try to refund as much as possible back to the vendors.

The post about the SR3 exit scam also served as an announcement for the opening of the future SR3.1.

Before the site went live, former SR3 vendors were allegedly contacted in an attempt to refund the Bitcoin lost during the SR3 exit scam.

There was even a form available on the Silk Road 3.1 site that could be used to recover lost funds, if the necessary evidence was provided.

Despite all attempts to make a positive first impression on the users of the darknet market, the stigma of the Silk Road’s name still deterred most people from trying out the new marketplace.

The market was active for around four months and it was starting to gain a reputation, despite retaining the infamous Silk Road brand that many members of the darknet community had learned to stay clear of.

Most of this was due to the fact that many buyers and vendors have reported that AlphaWaves was one of the best support administrators they’ve encountered on the dark web, and that they were very pleased with the way they were treated on SR3.

Earlier this month, a DarknetMarkets subreddit user named Skillzy2017 posted that Silk Road 3.1 and Lunacy’s Apache servers were leaking IPs.

The user claimed they contacted SR3.1’s support team with report, but they were soon banned from using the site after doing so.

Shortly after SR3.1 was closed, an announcement was released that the market’s servers had been hacked and the funds were stolen.

Reddit homepage on a monitor screen through a magnifying glass.
In the continuation of the post, the mod who goes by the name AlphaWaves claims that another mod called BattleStar was starting to become paranoid and had stopped working for the marketplace—causing the cessation of fund transfers.

A subreddit post said the site displayed a banner with the words “The End,” along with an alleged explanation of the situation.

The explanation stated that all the funds on SR3.1 were stolen, but that users’ personal information were not touched. Further down there is an offer, primarily to the owners of Hansa and Dream Market, that they take over all the equipment and software used for running SR3.1 for free and attempt to restart it.

There is also an offer for sale of said equipment to any “decent market/darknet personality” for the amount stolen, so that the cash trove could be refunded.

By doing so, said “personality” would gain ownership of the market.

There’s also information about SR3.1’s alleged daily turnover for the past week, along with details about active advertising outlets and user count data.

The announcement ends with a small field and captcha that can be filled out and used as a means of arranging the said sale of SR3.1.

The darknet market community is heavily divided on this topic, as is expected. Those who claimed that the Silk Road name brought only bad news after the initial market was taken down are holding on to the claim that the announcement was a lie and that, in reality, the owners of SR3.1 just pulled off an exit scam.

Others claim that the owners of SR3.1 were upstanding members of the darknet community, and that some third party entity was involved in this incident.

Whether or not these claims prove to be true, the reality is that the Silk Road 3.1 funds have most likely disappeared irreversibly. The only thing SR3.1 vendors and buyers can do is wait and see if somebody will step up and buyout the debt in the days to come.

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Silk Road 3 has Upgraded to Silk Road 3.1

The Evolution of the Silk Road Brand

The Original

Founded in 2011 by Ross Ulbricht, a.k.a. Dread Pirate Roberts, Silk Road was the first and definitely the most popular darknet market. But, back in 2013 the FBI arrested Ulbricht, sentenced him to two lifetime sentences and seized the website.

Ever since, people have tried to revive the original brand, and build their success on it, but all of them failed big time.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Silk Road is BACK ONLINE NOW as Silk Road 3.1 and open for business. The team did a change and upgrade for a reason we can only assume for security.

>> Click here to find the Silk Road 3.1 Guide <<

The Revival

Upgrade upgrading software program symbol blue computer keyboard
Just when we thought that we won’t see the Silk Road anymore, the new version is out, and it’s named Silk Road 3.1.

Just after the arrest of Ulbricht in 2013, a second version of the site appeared and claimed that it was run by the administrators from the original website. The admin of the new version was also called Dread Pirate Roberts, even though Ulbricht was already in prison.

People simply assumed that Ulbricht’sassociates wanted to make the government believe they had the wrong guy.

The same year, the FBI arrested two staff members of Silk Road 2, while the mastermind abruptly dissapeared promising to reinstate the website. The next year, its user accounts were hacked and $2.7 million worth of bitcoins were stolen, marking a definite end of the second version of the market.

Version 3

Keeping in mind how version 2 ended, it is understandable why Silk Road 3 received so many negative reactions when it launched in 2014. A host of users claimed that the third version of the marketplace was a scam.

So, the admins launched a new and improved version of the market.

Silk Road 3.1

According to the official website, Silk Road 3.1 was created because its predecessor was shut down and allegedly, most vendors moved to the new version of the market.

Now, if you want to access the site, it’s important to make sure you have all the precautionary measures in place—install Tor browser and opt for a decent VPN application.

When registering to Silk Road 3.1, you will be prompted to type in your username, password, pin code and to provide the correct captcha. You will be shown your personal recovery key; make sure you copy and paste it somewhere safe.

After the registration, simply log in using your credentials and you’re all set to browse the marketplace.

But before that, you’ll be greeted with a message prompting you that you’ll be able to reclaim your lost bitcoins if you were a user of the previous version of the site. Simply fill out the form and submit your request.

Keep in mind, though, that your old username won’t work so you’ll have to come up with a new one.

When it comes to user interface, the 3.1 iteration is quite similar to the previous version. At the top of the page, you’ll see the usual menu: home, messages, notifications, profile, orders, support, settings, uchat, faq, forum and logout, respectively.

Just below the dashboard, there’s a search bar, but if you are more into browsing, you can find your desired item(s) arranged in nine categories on the right side of the user interface.

What Can Users Buy on the 3.1 version?

Currently, there are more than 30,000 listings on the market. You can purchase the following types of drugs:

  • Cannabis
  • Opioids
  • Stimulants
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Psychedelic
  • Dissociatives
  • Prescription drugs

Aside from drugs, you can also buy fake money, eBooks, various accounts, etc. on the Silk Road 3.1.

Forbidden items on the market include weapons, child pornography, poisons and terrorism-related items. Also (interestingly), Russians are not welcome on the market in any capacity, to sell or to buy.

Of course, to purchase an item on the Silk Road 3.1, users have to make a bitcoin deposit. And similar to other markets, there’s a review system for both vendors and customers.

Admins recommend using the escrow payment system at all times, especially when buying from new vendors.

There is also the refund option, but only if it turns out that the vendor was a scammer. If the package is seized by the police, the buyer will not be granted a refund.

The Future of Silk Road 3.1

Text upgrade button, 3d rendering
Just after the arrest of Ulbricht in 2013, a second version of the site appeared and claimed that it was run by the administrators from the original website.

Most of the site’s old users claim that each attempt to revive the concept is in vain and that the brand is dead. After the Silk Road 2 fiasco, it will take a lot of time for any variant to again win over users’ trust.

As for the Silk Road 3.1, the darknet marketplace’s future is probably not very bright according to customer reactions. But, on the other hand, the ability to reclaim any lost bitcoins from the previous version is definitely a nice gesture which might just result in customers’ good will to forgive and forget. We’ll see!

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